The Elsevier Foundation Green & Sustainable Chemistry Challenge

the-elsevier-foundation-green-and-sustainable-chemistry-challenge-940x788-300x251Traditional dyeing processes require large amounts of water and create waste and toxic emissions leaving heavy ecological footprints. Not surprisingly, developing countries are disproportionally affected. Dr. Yunsang Kim, research associate at the Department of Textiles, Merchandising, and Interiors at the University of Georgia, led the development of an innovative textile dyeing technology that reduces wastewater and the release of toxic chemicals. His invention has the potential to transform the textile industry’s dying process while reducing adverse impacts on local communities and the environment. His team’s project was selected from more than 500 proposals to win the 2016 Elsevier Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge – a competition that stimulates innovative chemistry research that helps the environment  and low-resource communities.

Starting this year, the Elsevier Foundation has joined Elsevier’s chemistry journals team in running the contest. The Elsevier Foundation Green & Sustainable Chemistry Challenge is open to individuals and non-profit organizations whose projects use green and sustainable chemistry solutions to tackle some of the developing world’s greatest sustainability challenges whether in water, sanitation or energy.

Guidelines
Submissions closed on 15 September. Applications will be reviewed against the criteria established by The Elsevier Foundation Green & Sustainable Chemistry Challenge expert advisory group. Shortlisted candidates will be reviewed by a distinguished panel of judges and will be given the opportunity to refine their proposals.

Read the guidelines [PDF]

Judging Panel
Meet the judging panel

Prizes
The top five candidates will be invited to present their proposals at the Second International Green & Sustainable Chemistry Conference in Berlin, 14-17 May 2017, where the winners will be announced. The winning project in the Elsevier Green & Sustainable Chemistry Challenge will receive a € 50,000 award and the second prize winner will receive € 25,000. Read more about the 2016 Challenge.

 


Meet the winners of the 2016 First International Green & Sustainable Chemistry Conference

Yunsang Kim, PhD, displays the winner’s check, surrounded by Conference Chair Prof. Klaus Kümmerer, PhD (left), and Elsevier Senior Publisher Rob van Daalen.

The proposal presented by Dr. Yunsang Kim’s won first prize because of the innovative green chemistry aspect and the large positive impact on the environment: he will use innovative textile dyeing technology using nanocellulosic (NC) fibers to reduce the generation of wastewater and release of toxic chemicals

“I am really very happy and overwhelmed in winning this prize,” he said. “I feel responsible in developing this project to the next stage and for the actual implementation of the project, and I will do my very best for that.”

The textile industry is considered as one of the most ecologically harmful in the world. Yunsang’s project aims to develop an innovative textile dyeing technology using nanocellulosic fibers to reduce the generation of wastewater and release of toxic chemicals in dyeing process. The proposed technology is expected to reduce more than 80 percent of water consumption and help diminish environmental footprint of textile industries around the globe. The NC fibers are a naturally produced raw material that is abundant, biodegradable, and renewable in nature.

challenge winners

Second prize winners Prof. Suzana Yusup, PhD, and Daniel Joe Dailin, PhD, pose with pose with Conference Chair Prof. Klaus Kümmerer, PhD, (left) and Elsevier Senior Publisher Rob van Daalen.

Dr. Yusup’s team proposed to use a unique combination of different plant extracts to develop a water-based bio-pesticide. He will start his project with the formulation and development of synthesized bio-pesticide at laboratory scale. The bio-pesticide will be formulated using different plant extracts such as ginger, garlic, red chili and Neem. The formulated product will be tested on paddy plants and should improve the productivity of paddy fields.

“I am so exited and thrilled in winning this award,” Dr. Yusup said. “The prize will help us to implement our project in the local communities of our country, and we will our best to make this a successful project.”


Read the full article on Elsevier Connect: “Winners selected for the Green & Sustainable Chemistry Challenge”, 06 April 2016